Intrusive, but just how memorable?

by Graham Dodd on 22/07/2020

The door drop industry has for many years, rightly positioned itself as an intrusive medium.

After all, whether you are at home at the point of delivery, or return after distribution has taken place, you will need to pick everything up off of your doormat.

A consumer’s next actions may vary.

There are claims that such items are instantly, without even looking at them (?), deposited in the recycling receptacle and in reality the industry accepts that may sometimes be the case.

But despite that, for decades there have been multiple major advertisers from of all walks of life, for whom door drops are a vital and regular component part of their marketing mix.

Surely so many intelligent marketeers cannot consistently plough budget into a medium that does not consistently provide measurable ROI?

Current JICMail data will provide compelling evidence of how long consumers will retain door drop items, how many people in a household will engage with the items and how many commercial actions they will trigger.

That demands the print quality of the door drop item is good and the creative eye catching and engaging, to the extent that it will be recalled by members of the household at times that suit them, as JICMail endorses.

But recall on the doorstep can produce different results.

Last year, we completed our own distribution recall exercise, distributing items so 100% coverage was absolutely guaranteed and the recall results can be found here.

Clients will sometimes raise concern about the quality of service provided, commonly triggered by the Managing Director allegedly not receiving a copy, or response levels being lower than the client was expecting or hoping for.

It is important to note that there is no final mile supplier who is able to provide actual evidence of door drop items being delivered.

Royal Mail door to door have a street level structure based upon hundreds of households, which is directly linked to individual postal workers.

But when using teams consisting of multiple distributors, TLC will use the services of those with tracking facilities that show the general path a distributor has taken, but its not a nationwide service because of the proliferation of companies.

So when you then consider the recall results of our test, even on the same day the item was distributed, you should accept that staff, friends and family may not always be quite as reliable as you would hope.

Some of the negative results on our test were from properties where you could actually see the item on a table or window ledge!

Door drops are not a perfect medium and don’t believe anyone who claims to guarantee that.

TLC have just published their new guide to team based distributions, simply stating what any client can expect from that particular service and if you would like to receive a copy, please email sales@letterboxconsultancy.co.uk.

As ever, TLC’s unique positioning as a door drop media independent, with no in-house final mile solutions, set us apart from the pack.

So for realistic, common sense door drop proposals, based upon decades of experience, feel free to contact us at any time.

This article was written by...

– who has written 86 posts on Letterbox Consultancy for Door Drop Marketing.

Graham Dodd is the founder of The Letterbox Consultancy - he has over 40 years of experience in the door drop industry and remains at the forefront of innovation in the business.

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